Six on Saturday – January 18th

After storms and very wet weather the garden is pretty much sodden. Then last night a sharp frost has left everything frozen solid. It was minus 4.5 degrees Celsius this morning – not often we get it that cold here in the west of Ireland.

  1. Poor robin was feeling the cold – all fluffed out trying to keep warm. We put extra food out this morning for all the birds.
Robin

Robin

2.  The pond is frozen too. We did a bit of pond maintenance last week – taking out quite a lot of sedges that had spread through the shallower end and bog bean which had taken over half the deep end. It looks quite a bit better.

Pond - frozen

Pond – frozen

3. I wonder if the honeysuckle is now regretting send out leaves?

Honeysuckle

Honeysuckle

4. The creeping raspberry looks very pretty with its frosted fringe. This is a good ground cover plant but we have never got any fruit from it. The bees do like the flowers though.


Creeping Raspberry

Creeping Raspberry, Rubus nepalensis (I think)

5. The poultry were finding it cold this morning too. Nelson (our drake) kept walking a few steps and then sitting down as if he was trying to warm his feet. Junior, the cockerel was crowing standing on one foot.

6. And finally our roof is looking a bit like a green roof at the moment. Possibly because of the really wet winter it seems to have become populated with lots of moss. I don’t really mind – it looks pretty.

moss covered roof

moss covered roof

Thanks to The Propagator for hosting – Six on Saturday

Window with a view

This is the view from the summer house at Laugharne Castle in south Wales which we visited last year. The window overlooks the Taf Estuary. Dylan Thomas, the famous welsh author is supposed to have used the summer house to write. And the view is certainly inspiring.

Summer house at Laugharne castle

Summer house at Laugharne castle

Inspired by this week’s Lens-artist photo challenge – Window with a view

Carrowtige Loop Walk, Co. Mayo

The Mayo coast is one of those places special spots. The north and far north western corners of the coast are a bit off the beaten track. Back in November we had the opportunity to do part of the Carrowtige Loop walk. The full walk is over 10km long but it is possible to do shorter loops (of about 3km), which we did. The walk offers spectacular views of Broadhaven bay, the Atlantic ocean and majestic sea cliffs.

Atlantic ocean with kid island in the background

Atlantic ocean with Kid island in the background

We were lucky to have got one of those bright winter days but the wind coming from the ocean was bracing to say the least. In the distance of the photo below you can see the Stags of Broadhaven, some rocky outcrops that jut into the Atlantic.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Coastal cliffs and sea stacks

The surrounding landscape is bogland, a rare and important habitat and an important carbon sink in a time of climate change.

Carrowtige is Ceathrú Thaidhg in Irish. Ceathrú means quarter or quarterland and Thadhg is the name of a person.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Kid island is grazed by sheep – how the farmers get them onto this rocky island is a bit of a mystery to me!

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Kid island

 

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

A beautiful place

 

 

 

Bye bye 2019

As we say goodbye to 2019 and the decade, I wanted to take the opportunity to thank all of you that have taken the time to read, like or comment on my blog. You support and interest keeps me writing and posting photographs – I could not do it without you.

Coal tit

Coal tit

Our world is a constantly changing place – sometimes for the better, sometime for the worst. Let us hope that 2020 and the new decade will bring lots more positives, for our environment, wildlife, and for people everywhere.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

The Burren, Co Clare

Our little planet is beautiful and wonderful. Living here should inspire us all to do what we can to make it a safe, peaceful and glorious place for all things.

Happy New Year!