Tag Archives: Lens Artist Photo Challenge

Lens-Artists Photo Challenge #217 – Opposites

This week it is all about opposites. Many thanks to Tina for this week’s challenge. My first try of “image compare” on wordpress – if you haven’t tried it before, slide bar across to see full image.

Closed – open

Black standing – pale sitting
Spikey – soft

Lens-Artists Photo Challenge #216 – Urban Environments

I am not generally someone who takes photographs in urban areas – but here are a few images from a trip to a small town during our holiday in Wales this summer.

Many thanks to Sofia for this week’s challenge.

Lens-Artists Photo Challenge #215

For this week’s Len-artist challenge John asks for “Planes, Trains, and Automobiles… and the Places they take us” – but I have veered off topic a little to talk about places boats have taken me. In recent years, we have had a few interesting trips on boats – or at least the boats got us to our destination. The first trip was to Clare Island off the west coast of Ireland. A small ferry takes about 20 minutes to cross from mainland to the island.

Early morning ferry to Clare island

The island is lovely. We visited in January – but the day was glorious and clear and the light beautiful.

Then home again on the ferry at sunset.

Our next island visit was to Inishbiggle. Also off the west coast, but a much smaller island – talking only about ten minutes in a small boat similar to the small boat in the picture below.

Here crossing over from the mainland.

The island is lovely, exceptionally quiet (there are not many families living on it now) and the only shame was all the abandoned cars (and tractors) that it is too expensive to remove and so are left to rust away.

Great Yellow Bumblebee Project

This year, I have been lucky to be working for the Great Yellow Bumblebee Project. The Great Yellow Bumblebee is Ireland’s rarest bees and it occurs on the Mullet Peninsula and Erris coastal mainland of County Mayo in the west of Ireland.

Great Yellow Bumblebee (Bombus distinguendus)

We have been working with farmers looking at how best we can manage fields in a way that provides lots of flowers for all types of pollinators. This area of County Mayo is stunningly beautiful, and supports a unique flower-rich habitat called Machair.

Machair grassland

Machair is traditionally been used as winter grazing, which has benefitted the wildflowers that grow here and in turn these areas support a wealth of insects including pollinators.

Machair grassland

We find lots of different bees. And finding the the rarest of them all, the Great Yellow Bumblebee, brings deep satisfaction.

Great Yellow Bumblebee (Bombus distinguendus)

Other rare and vulnerable bee species can also be found in this special place.

Many thanks to Ann-Christine for providing inspiration for this post – LAPC #214 Favourite Finds

Lens-Artists Photo Challenge #213 – Here Comes the Sun

This week Amy asks is to explore the sun.

I love the sun on water, the way it makes it shimmer and shine.

Achill island from Doohoma, Co Mayo

Without the sun we would not have plants. This one is a native Irish plant called the perennial sow-thistle. But I like to think of it as our own sunflower. They are tall plants – from 80 cm up to 150 cm with these glorious yellow heads and they are loved by bees and other pollinators.

Perennial sow-thistle

With the sun, comes shadows and butterflies too of course.

Wall brown butterfly

And without the sun we wouldn’t have sunsets.

Sunset

Many thanks to Amy for this week’s lovely challenge.

Lens-Artists Photo Challenge #207 – Seeing Double

This week Jez at Photos by Jez is hosting LAPC – Seeing Double. I too like reflections, and it is always fun trying to get a good frog reflection when the frogs return to our pond in the spring. I still haven’t managed the perfect photo – but I will keep trying.

frog

But I have added another “double” from our recent trip to Wales – this sign hung above a shop and I thought it pretty cool.

double hare