Category Archives: Biodiversity

Celebrating International day of Biodiversity

22nd May is International Day of Biodiversity. Here are just a few of the recent highlights from the garden and further afield. There is so much wonderful biodiversity out there. Go and explore.

Would you like to learn how to help pollinators

Roscommon County Council Heritage Office are funding us to do two free workshops on pollinators. These workshops are ideal for those involved in Tidy Towns and local community projects, but anyone interested in pollinators are welcome to attend. Please pre-book as detailed below. While October is not a good time to see pollinators we hope to discuss lots of ideas of things you can do to help pollinators in your community.poster2

Perplexed

Today’s daily post got me thinking, or maybe perplexing would be a more accurate a description. Here we on living on a planet, blessed with fresh air, clean water, the most amazing biodiversity you could imagine. And yet we continue to pollute and destroy.

If you could just do one thing for this amazing place we call home, then think about one of these options:

  1. Compost all your green waste
  2. Plant some flowers. No garden – then plant some in a pot or window box
  3. Stop using chemicals in your garden (herbicides, pesticides) and in your home (vinegar, lemon juice and baking soda are great for cleaning)
  4. Plant a tree
  5. Build a bird box
  6. Give your old clothes to a charity shop
  7. Feed the birds and enjoy watching them visit your feeder
  8. Grow some vegetables
  9. Volunteer to help with a community clean up
  10. Smile

If you are already doing them, then give yourself a clap on the back!

via Daily Prompt: Perplexed

Last days of summer for pollinators

As autumn makes it’s fast progress, it is the final chance for our pollinators to make the best of the last flowers. Some are battered and bruised from their long season; others (like the new queens bees)¬† are building up their resources to get them through the winter, hidden away in quiet and neglected corners of your garden.

 

August Wildflowers

This week in Ireland we celebrate Heritage Week. A week of celebration of all our Irish heritage, nature, history, people and more.

A big thank you to all those who attended the wildflowers walks I was involved in over the weekend at the Foxford Riverfest and Glore Mill near KIltimagh. It was wonderful to see so many interested people, both young and old.

A couple of people mention was how lovely it is to learn the names of plants but then how easy it is to forget, days later. So I thought I’d put together a post of some of what we saw to help.

Purple Loosestrife

One of the favourites. A great plant for bees and butterflies. Purple Loosestrife likes damp ground, and can be often seen in large clumps. Meadowsweet (see below), likes similar conditions and they are often found together. Loosestrife has a high tannin content and was used for tanning leather. The flowers were used for making a dye.

Meadow Sweet

It’s well worth stopping to smell this flower, it has a heavy almost intoxicating scent! It gets it name from “mead sweet” – because it was used to flavour and sweeten mead. It was also added to wines and ales. In folk medicine it was used as a painkiller and anti-inflammatory. It contains salicylic acid, which was synthesized into aspirin.

Tufted Vetch

Another great bee plant. We have many different vetches in Ireland and Tufted vetch is one that flowers later in the season. All vetches are legumes and can fix their own nitrogen.

Willowherb

Willowherb

Willowherb

We have a number of willowherb species growing in Ireland. Willowherbs are also visited by bees. The leaves have been used to make tea. It is popular in Russia and know as Kaporie tea. Some species such as rosebay willowherb can be a bit invasive.

 

 

 

 

Ragworth

Ragworth can be toxic to livestock. They know not to eat it but if cut in hay or silage it can be accidentally eaten. However, quite large quantities need to be eaten for it to have it’s toxic effect. though horses seems particularly sensitive. Cinnabar moth caterpillar use this toxicity to protect themselves from being eaten. These brightly coloured caterpillar that only feed on ragworth. Ragworth has been used in folk medicine too. It’s visited by hoverflies and some some solitary bees.