Category Archives: Biodiversity

Hoverfly

A photo from my archives. Hoverflies are important pollinators in Ireland and elsewhere.

Hoverfly

Hoverfly

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A frog in the hand….

Regular readers will remember we had plenty of frogs in the pond earlier in the year and lots of spawn. The tadpoles are now developing into little frogs. My youngest spotted a couple moving from the pond to the hedgerow.

A frog in the hand

A frog in the hand

They are so tiny. The fact that any of these creatures can make it to a full -sized adult frog is truly amazing. How big the world must seem to them!

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Saturday Bumbles

Red-tailed bumblebees are lovely looking bees. The workers and queens as below, are jet black with a red tail. The males are similar but have a yellow band on it’s head and yellow face hairs. They are only occasional visitors to my garden but they are around at the moment, though this one was photographed on the West coast of Ireland.  They have a “near-threatened” status in Ireland.

Bombus lapidarius

Bombus lapidarius

National Biodiversity Week

We are already half way through Ireland’s biodiversity week, and computer issues and work have meant that I am only now getting around post about it. Biodiversity Week, which runs from 17th to the 27th May 2018, aims to celebrate all of Ireland’s wonderful biodiversity and looks at connecting people with nature. There are lots of events, walls, talks and workshops.

There are many simple things you can do to connect with nature in your own garden. Since starting my garden here 13 years ago, one of my main aims has been to increase biodiversity.

Here are some of my tips.

  • Plant trees. Fruit trees are a great option as they provide spring blossom for many pollinators and of course fruit later in the season.
Green veined white on apple blossom

Green veined white on apple blossom

  • Plant flowers. I love native wildflowers and have flowers meadows as well as including wild flowers in my flowers beds and vegetable patch.

Meadow

  • Plant a hedge. We have blackbirds, and dunnocks nesting in our hedge this year.
hedge with climbing rose

hedge with climbing rose

  • Dig a pond. Ponds attract frogs, newts and many aquatic insects including amazing dragonflies.
Frogs in pond

Frogs in pond

  • Put up some bird, bat and solitary bee boxes.
bee box

bee box

  • Get involved in some citizen science Programmes.  This week the National Biodiversity Data Centre are encouraging everyone to send in their butterfly records.

Enjoy nature!

 

 

 

World Bee Day

Today, Sunday 20th May, is World Bee Day. It is a day to celebrate our wonderful bees, but it is also a day to reflect on how bee populations continue to decline.

Carder bumblebee on apple blossom

Carder bumblebee on apple blossom

Bees recorded in the 2017 National Bee Monitoring Scheme showed their lowest numbers since 2012. A total population loss of just over 14% has been recorded between 2012-2017.

There are things we can all do to help bees. Here is just a few examples:

  • Join a bee monitoring scheme. These citizen science programmes are a great way to learn more about bees yourself,  but also contribute important information about the health of bee populations.
  • Plants some flowers! Ideally pollinator-friendly flowers. For example, cottage garden varieties (e.g. delphiniums), nasturtiums, herbs and heathers. It is also important to have flowers from early spring to the first frost to provide food throughout the season.
  • Don’t be too tidy. Leave areas of tall vegetation for nesting bumblebees, leave vegetables (particularly overwintering brassicas to flower)  allow dandelions to flower before mowing lawns.
  • And finally enjoy bees!

 

For more information check out the following pollinator website.

#WorldBeeDay

 

 

 

 

Awakening

Bumblebee queens are waking up for the spring. Everything is late this year, as it had been a cold spring, so it’s good to see the bees emerging.

Early bumblebee

Early bumblebee

You will notice this lady has some passengers. These phoretic mites (Parasitellus) do not harm the bee. They will fall off when she sets up a nest and will act as nest cleaners.

Via this week’s photo challenge – Awakening

Important EU Public Consultation on Pollinators

Following on from my bumblebee post yesterday, here is an important pubic consultation on an EU Pollinator Initiative. The consultation is open to anyone living in Europe, you don’t have to be an expert. If you have any interest in pollinators I urge you to fill out the questionnaire. It only takes about ten minutes, and you have till the 5th of April to complete.

The survey can be accessed by clicking here.

And more information bout the initiative can be found here.

Bumblebee

Bumblebee