Future

We cannot tell what lies ahead of us, we cannot predict our future and maybe it is just as well. What we do know is the world is changing, as it has always done, but now it is in a way that frightens me. I fear for my children’s future in a world where climate change will dominate everything. I fear for my children’s future in a world where political leaders still fail to heed the urgency of the crisis.

So let us do something positive for our future, for the future of our children, let us try as suggested by Ann-Christine (Leya) to –Β do something today that your future self will thank you for.

  1. Plant a tree. While they are growing trees will store carbon, and provide habitats for insects, birds and other wildlife.
Oak tree

Oak tree

2. Grow some of your own vegetables. Cut down on those food miles and enjoy so really fresh food.

Broccoli

Broccoli

3. Don’t buy compost containing peat. Peatlands are being destroyed throughout Europe to provide compost for gardens, parks and the horticultural industry. Yet peatlands store about half a trillion tonnes of carbon, twice as much as is estimated to be stored by the world’s forests (from The Garden Jungle – Dave Goulson). I am guilty of buying peat compost too (peat-free is hard to source here), but I am determined after reading this statistic not to buy any more.

Peatland - Ballycroy National Park

Peatland – Ballycroy National Park

4. Have a compost heap – no room – then start a wormery. Picture below is of my newish hot composter, but we also have wooden pallet compost heaps (of which I cannot find any photos!) in the garden.

Hot composter

Hot composter

5. Plant some flowers for pollinators. Pollinators are so important for pollinating so many of our food crops. But flowers also provide food for other insects too.

bumblebee

bumblebee

6. Leave an area of your garden to grow just a little bit wild, and be chemical free!

Grass and wildflowers

Grass and wildflowers

Also joining in this week’s The Propagators Six on Saturday – slight variation on the theme this week, as Storm Ciara prevented any photos being taken today:)

 

 

 

 

36 thoughts on “Future

  1. Leya

    Thank you for a great post – for us all to consider! It does not need to be so difficult, just start! You make it clear and beautiful – and thinking about peat rang a bell. I learned something new/had strangely enough never thought about this before!

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    1. Murtagh's Meadow Post author

      Thank you Leya. I have known about peat for a long time but the recent statistic has really got motivated to be totally peat free and to share the message where I can.

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    1. Murtagh's Meadow Post author

      Exactly. We’ve just had an election here yesterday and I was disappointed that climate change was not much higher up the agenda.

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  2. Heyjude

    I have planted lots of plants for the pollinators and there is plenty of untamed stuff in the Cornish hedges around me, but growing my own food hasn’t been a success and my composter takes years to break down stuff. How good is the hot one? At the moment I pay for the council to take my green waste away. I have heard that some peat free compost is not very good, but I am willing to give it a try even though it is more expensive. I think Dalefoot compost is supposed to be excellent, have you tried that?

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    1. Murtagh's Meadow Post author

      Dave Goulson recommends SylvaGrow peat-free compost. I too have had issues with some peat-free composts. As for composting I think the trick it balancing your types of waste and having more than one heap. I am hoping to do a post on composting soon. Still early days for hot composter – but I will report back.

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  3. Wild Daffodil

    Great post.
    I am constantly looking for more ways to walk lightly on the earth. I make compost, I make every journey I make in the car multifunctional, I have photo-voltaic roof panels, I buy local, I flush my loo with bath-water, I collect rainwater…. the list goes on, but there is always something more to be done.
    A couple of weeks ago I realised that if I keep a jug of tap water in the kitchen, the temperature of it becomes ‘room temperature’ so when I put it in the kettle to make a cup of tea, it will take less electricity to bring it to the boil. This makes me very happy! πŸ™‚

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  4. Hortus Baileyana

    I did a post on reducing plastic use last week. I wasn’t sure if anyone would be interested in reading it. It’s so encouraging to realise from your post and all the supportive comments above, that others are trying to reduce their impact on this planet too.

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    1. Murtagh's Meadow Post author

      It is very heartening that so many are trying. All we can do is our best and encourage others to do likewise. Together our small steps can make a big difference 😊

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  5. dust4y

    All brilliant ideas and I think that as well as helping the planet, it cheers me up when everything can be so negative around. Action gives hope to things so I’ll definitely be growing more.

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  6. aj vosse

    All great things to do!
    One thing I don’t get, and I hope you can help by putting a different perspective on it, please? Carbon is a non toxic life element – CO2 has a small proportion of green house effect compared with water vapour – therefore, my question… why is carbon vilified? Why must a carbon tax be forced upon us? Why must the man in the street subsidise unsustainable so called green energy?
    Also… don’t you think all the lies and hype about climate change is really what is scaring our children?
    We may differ in our understanding of the situation, that does not mean we don’t love and care for our environment – I’d love for all the efforts to be put into deducing or illuminating pollution. Why is big agriculture still allowed to chemically enhance mono-culture practices that are detrimental to the environment? Why is the chemical industry allowed to manufacturer toxins we ingest, big pharma, big soda and big food prop up the political systems… that’s where the real problem lies – not with carbon!

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    1. Murtagh's Meadow Post author

      I am not a climate change expert – I just know looking outside my window that things are changing and not for the better. My kids are worried because they know that it is not normal to have 700% more rain in just two weeks of February – to the extent that they can hardy get outside to play and when they do they come back covered in mud. I know you appreciate the environment and love mother nature every bit as I do. And I agree there are big problems with the way we grow food using vast quantities of chemicals that are only causing harm and lining the pockets of the big manufactures . We have a long way to go to put things to right.

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