Tag Archives: Wren

Six on Saturday – 18th July 2020

The weather continues cool and cloudy. It started off lovely and sunny this morning but clouded over. We are hoping for a bit more sun later. Meanwhile in the garden all the young birds are keeping us entertained. There are young blackbirds, swallows, goldfinches, robins, dunnocks and these little wrens. Four are squeezed into this little box which the kids painted years ago. Every time an adult comes with food they are poking their heads out!

Wrens

2. Next this week is alliums – little ones. There are a few just coming out.

Alliums

3. Yarrow with hoverfly.

4. A rather wet nasturtium.

Nasturtium

5. I love the blue flowers of hyssop.

Hyssop

6. The blackbirds have found the Logan and Tayberries too, but we have managed to pick some. They just need a bit of sunshine to sweeten up.

Thanks to The Propagator for hosting Six on Saturday

Wren’s nest

Regular readers may have read my previous post about the wren fledgling. The photo below is a wren’s nest, and the very reason why you shouldn’t get rid of the moss on your lawn.

Wren nest

Wren nest

Male wrens build a couple of nest at the start of the breeding season and the female decides which one she wishes to lay her eggs in. This year, our resident female chose the one the male had built in the old swallow’s nest. It appears to have been a good choice, as we found this one in the middle of a comprey plant. Heavy rain had caused the tall comprey stems to fall over, exposing the nest.

 

 

A bird in the hand

Yesterday, this little wren accidentally got into the house.

Wren fledgling

Wren fledgling

Most of the doors and windows are open as we experience exceptionally warm days, with yesterday temperatures reaching 25 degrees Celsius. Normal May temperatures in the west of Ireland tend to be in the mid-high teens.

The wrens had converted last year’s swallow’s nest into their own nest and have been busy feeding the chicks the last couple of weeks. The young appear to have just fledged. This little fellow proved hard enough to catch! But my husband, a trained bird ringer, got him eventually.

We didn’t think it would wait around to be photographed, but either because of the shock of being caught, or the near-by presence of one of it’s parents (with beak full of food), it stayed long enough for me to get a couple of shots, before making a short, yet confident  flight to the beech hedge.

During lunch we watched both parents come and go with more food to the hedge.  The fledglings remained concealed though so we are not sure how many there are.

Wren

Wren fledgling

Wrens are among Ireland’s smallest birds. The female lay clutches of 5-8 eggs, and she alone will incubate them. They feed on insects and spiders. Both parents will help feed the young. For more information can check out Birdwatch Ireland’s Wren page.