Tag Archives: Earth Day

Happy Earth Day

I started drafting an Earth Day post that was becoming depressing. So I have decided on a list of ten positive actions anyone can do for our Mother Earth instead. Actions to help us live in harmony with the planet we call home.

  1. Go outside. Close your eyes for fifteen second and use you ears to listen and your nose to smell.
  2. Plant some vegetable or herb seeds, even if it is only in a pot or window box.
  3. Walk or cycle somewhere you would usually drive to.
  4. Find a local farm shop and buy something.
  5. If you live in Ireland, sign the petition to strengthen the draft climate change plan. If you live in another country find out what your government is doing about climate change.
  6. If you have left overs from dinner, eat them the following day for lunch. Don’t throw them in the bin
  7. Make a more sustainable choice in one food product you buy each week. For example, buy organic free range eggs, or organic flour etc.
  8. Pick a sunny day, and look in your garden or go to your nearest park and see how many bees and butterflies you can see.
  9. Instead of your usual present when you go to visit someone bring them a nice flowering plant they can put in their garden.
  10. Find a new woodland, nature reserve or other wild place to visit.

Happy Earth Day

Today the 22nd April is EARTH DAY. If you only do one thing for the environment this year leave some wildflowers in you garden for some pollinators. If you don’t have any flowers, buy some seeds and plant some. If you don’t have a garden buy a window box or pot and do the same.

It will add a sparkle to your life! My 5 year old just asked why the bee was all sparkly – I explained that it was the pollen on it!

Bumblebee on dandelion

Bumblebee on dandelion

Why grow Organically?

Firstly Happy Earth Day. Through my job I get to meet kids and was delighted yesterday to have some sing me the Earth Day song, all about us looking after the earth. It warmed my heart.

For me one of the best ways of showing our appreciation of mother nature is to garden organically. For those of us that grow our food organically the last month has yet again proven us to be on the right track. A report issued by the World Health Organisation has linked Glyphosate, the main ingredient of the herbicide Roundup, as a possible carcinogen. Monsanto are trying to get the report retracted. According to Wikipedia ‘Monsanto Company is a publicly traded American multinational agrochemical and agricultural biotechnology corporation’. According to Monsanto’s own website ‘Monsanto is a sustainable agriculture company’. That made me laugh, because in my opinion chemicals and GMO crops are as far from ‘sustainable’ as it could be! Glyphosate earns the company about $6 billion per year to the company.

Pear blossom

Pear blossom

In the 1990’s, Monsanto genetically engineered crops to withstand being sprayed with Roundup. These crops (e.g Soybean and corn) known as “Roundup Ready” became popular with farmers but more recently the weeds have been developing a resistance to the herbicide and so farmers are having to spray more and more. Monsanto are probably rubbing their hands together in glee as it’s more money for their shareholders.

For me there is no such thing as a ‘weed’. Only a plant in the wrong place. I may dig dandelions out of my vegetable plot but they grow in profusion in our lawn and orchard areas,  where they feed bees, hoverflies and butterflies who in turn pollinate our fruit trees and vegetables.

Dandelion

Dandelion

I grow food to feed my family. I would never put chemicals on them, it just doesn’t make sense to me. In fact, I wouldn’t put chemicals anywhere in my garden. We need to live in harmony with nature, learn to work with it and not against it.

Tomato

Tomato

Celeriac

Celeriac

 

Avaaz.org are running a petition (https://secure.avaaz.org/en/monsanto_dont_silence_science_loc_eu/?twvkneb) asking the relevant authorities to take into consideration the studies from the International Agency for Research on Cancer’s report in their current safety assessments, and to ensure all reviews are transparent, based on independent studies, and evaluated by independent researchers without conflicts of interest.