In memory of Jemima

Our duck Jemima was named after the wonderful Beatrix Potter character Jemima Puddle Duck, because of her habitat of trying to hide her eggs. Like all ducks she was at her happiest in the duck pond. She was a plucky little duck, not afraid to let herself be heard particularly if she was hungry.

Jemima with Nelson

Jemima with Nelson

Jemima with Nelson

Jemima with Nelson

With her mate Nelson she spent hours in the vegetable plot searching for slugs and other food.

Jemima with Nelson

Jemima with Nelson

We’ve had her for over six years and we will miss her.

Jemima in her early years with her sister and Nelson

Jemima in her early years with her sister and Nelson not quite sure what to make of the snow

 

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27 thoughts on “In memory of Jemima

    1. Murtagh's Meadow Post author

      He was very protective of her. Of all of us he will miss her most I am sure. But we will be looking for a new duck to keep him company.

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  1. aranislandgirl

    Sorry to hear about her passing. How are the children with it? And how many ducks do you have in all?…just curious as we’ve stopped allowing ours in the garden for they trample down lettuces, carrots, really they are most inconsiderate towards all tender veg.

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    1. Murtagh's Meadow Post author

      We only have them in the veg plot over the winter. Once I start setting things we take them out and put them with the chickens. We’ve only had the two, so will have to get another, can’t have poor Nelson on his own. He tolerates the chicken but I don’t think they are friends in particular.. Kids are quite practical about it – it’s not the first animals we have lost, and I am always honest with them about such things. My daughter (5) was pretty sad, but we buried her this morning and said our goodbyes and she was happy with that.

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      1. aranislandgirl

        Well that makes sense. Funny, we try to shoo ours into the garden and tunnel off season but they resist…well aware it is forbidden territory I suppose. Will have to work on baiting them better as it would be nirvana, unexplored territory. And they are so efficient at eating the darned slugs. đŸ˜€

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      2. Murtagh's Meadow Post author

        They certainly are- we have much fewer problems with slugs early in the season as they have efficiently reduce the population – but at this time of the year I can’t grow lettuce in the garden anymore as the slug population is up again!!

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    1. Murtagh's Meadow Post author

      We’re not sure to be honest Cathy. She had been poorly for couple of days and we’d moved her away from the other poultry and put her in the little duck house in the veg plot but she was not content to stay there and hide herself among the runner beans. I’d checked on her a couple of hours before and went out to put her in but she was dead. “Something” had taken out a few feathers, but she may have already been dead. It’s unlikely that a fox would have gone into veg garden but it could have been a mink (we’ve had them before). All around I feel guilty because if I had put her in her house earlier this may not have happened. Poor thing. I just hope she didn’t suffer.

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    1. Murtagh's Meadow Post author

      No she never sat actually. Khaki Campbell (the part breed she was) are said to be bad mothers – not having the patience to sit long enough on their eggs, though they are among the best layers

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  2. Jane

    Perhaps an egg incubator if you get another part Khaki Campbell – you never know. What a lovely duck and so the right thing that you gave her a proper send off. She had a wonderful life with you all and what a character she was. Here’s to you finding a lovely companion for dear, lovely Nelson. Many cups of tea are in order, I think.

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  3. Pingback: Meet Jemima ii | Murtagh's Meadow

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