Garden flowers – June update

Over the last couple of years I have been trying to increase the number of flowers in the garden, specifically to help our pollinators but also for our own enjoyment. Flowers add so much – colour, scent and of course the fun of watching bees, butterflies and other insects.

My wildflower success this year has been ragged robin. I have always loved this flower and two years ago bought some wildflower seed as I wanted it around our pond. The seeds didn’t germinate very well but I gather seed last year from the couple of plants I did manage to grow and these germinated brilliantly. So I had enough plants to try some in the meadow too, where I thought it may be a bit dry but where they seem to be doing well despite the lack of rain. Buttercups seem to be doing particularly well this year and many fields around us are yellow with them.

Meanwhile the bee and butterfly garden is proving attractive to bees but not so many butterflies yet! Some of the delphiniums have suffered slug damage so I may need to grow a few more.

Other flowers include these lovely heritage roses which clamber though the hedge. They are heavy scented. And the blue irises by the pond always seem to do well here though I have tried to grow them elsewhere in the garden and they disappeared after one poor year of flowering.

Finally this flower is actually a vegetable – scorzonera. I tried growing last year as a veg but again had poor germination so thought I’d leave a few plants in the ground and see if I could get seed. They have rewarded me with lovely yellow flowers that smell of marshmallows. The flowers grow on tall stalk about 60-80cm high.

scorzonera

scorzonera

 

 

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23 thoughts on “Garden flowers – June update

  1. Julie

    The images of your Bee garden is absolutely beautiful. I can imagine sitting and watching Bees there is very relaxing and peaceful. The meadow and pond area are also very beautiful. Well done on your Ragged Robin flowers, that must have been thrilling to see them germinate.

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    1. Murtagh's Meadow Post author

      Thank you so much Julie for your kind words. It is still a work in progress as gardens always are but it does bring me much enjoyment if not also an element of frustration at times!

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  2. gaiainaction

    All very beautiful flowers in your garden, and so valuable to the bees and other insects, so valuable to grow the flowers for this reason. Of course the beautiful colours are a feast to the eye. I personally love buttercups for their shining golden yellow, so bright, and in combination with the green in a meadow one of the most beautiful scenes on earth. Love photos and writing.

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    1. Murtagh's Meadow Post author

      Thank you – I have a bit of a love hate relationship with buttercups as I am constantly battling with creeping buttercup in the veg plot. Left to it’s own devises it would take over! But you are right – they are a wonderful colour!

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    1. Murtagh's Meadow Post author

      Thank you Melissa. That’s exactly (well more of less) what Dave Goulson says in his book “Buzz in the Meadow” – which I would thoroughly recommend.

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    1. Murtagh's Meadow Post author

      No, the irises are tall – probably about 80cm or so. Scorzonera is also called “black salsify” and is related to dandelion. It’s the tap root you eat. Hard to describe taste but pleasant and you can cook like a parsnip. Good alternative winter veg if I can get better germination

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      1. heretherebespiders

        Sorry I meant the blooms themselves are small, only about 8-10 cm or so? The stalks are tall here.
        Ah, I have heard of salsify! Maybe on one of the wildflower FB pages or blogs. I’m interested, will look into it.

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  3. aj vosse

    So vibrant! I love the effect of the wild flowers and the rewards of seeing them attracting the Bees and butterflies! And birds… to eat the slugs! I removed a slug off one of my precious tomato plants only minutes ago! 😉

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    1. Murtagh's Meadow Post author

      I was watching some leaf cutter bees yesterday, the colour of their underside depending on which pollen they were collecting – either red or yellow! Nature is wonderful!

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  4. Jane

    What a wonderful array. Love the Ragged Robin – do you get your seeds from a special heritage website? How delicate is the Meadow Cranesbill and could we grow Scarzonera over here – never heard of it. Its flowers are splendid.

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    1. Murtagh's Meadow Post author

      The ragged robin seed I got from “Seedaholic” online – she does range of wildflowers as well as other seeds. Yes the scarzonera will probably do even better there in the UK as it probably is a couple of degrees warmer than here!

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