Croaghmoyle Walk

Today we went for a lovely walk up Croaghmoyle. In Irish it is called An Chruach Mhaol which means the bare-topped stack. Truth be told we did not actually get to the top as it started to rain quite heavily and we had to turn back, but we still got great views. The area is a Natural Heritage Area.

If you look closely you can see the track going up the hill

If you look closely you can see the track going up the hill

The track is good so it made for easy walking despite the rain. The start wanders through conifer plantations but the edges are packed with flowers, tormentil, heather, heath bedstraw and birdsfoot trefoil. I was amazed by how many ringlet butterflies were about despite the rain. Some seemed to be laying eggs on grasses which is what the caterpillar feeds on.

We also spotted a lovely common blue. The first I have seen this summer. It was trying to shelter from the rain too (so not the best photo). The forewing is an amazing blue in the males, though the females are less showy and more blue/brown.

Common blue

Common blue

Some of the sheep (recently sheared) had found some shelter for themselves, from the heavy rain. They are grazing what is known as commonage land – shared by a number of farmers. The farmers colour-code their sheep so they know who they belong to. In the distance of the second photograph you may be able to make out some wind turbines.

In the past, there had been a couple of farm homesteads here. They are long gone and all that remains are the outlines of some fields and the odd building, becoming surrounded by trees.

Back down at the bottom there is a little lake hidden among some of the trees, called Lough Ben. White water-lilies were just coming into flower.

Lough Ben

Lough Ben

 

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19 thoughts on “Croaghmoyle Walk

    1. Murtagh's Meadow Post author

      Yes, so they get a bit of spray paint and may have a dab of red, or a dab of blue and if they are wet it may run a bit as seems to be the case here.

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  1. Marija

    I love the idea of colour-coded sheep…do they know they’re colour coded? Do they run with each other, or do they merge into a technicolour dream coat flock? As ever, lovely photos despite less-than-perfect light conditions. đŸ™‚

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    1. Murtagh's Meadow Post author

      I think they do tend to stick to their own flock – as you usually see the same colours together:)

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  2. Robbie

    oh so beautiful:-) so peaceful to walk there-…the sheep reminded me of my daughter when she was in high school and jr. high..she put purple tips on her blond hair and pink-LOL-I could pick her out on the soccer field in High school they called her deep purple- just came to my mind when I read they colored their sheep:-)

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    1. Murtagh's Meadow Post author

      Great idea – it’s really nice and we’d love to do it again on a clear sunny day as I think views will be amazing.

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  3. Jane

    You make it feel as though I’m there with your observations and clever pictures. Hadn’t realised that sheep actually stick their heads under the hedges when it’s raining..

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    1. Murtagh's Meadow Post author

      The sheep had recently be sheared and were probably missing their wooly coat and feeling a bit cool!

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  4. Pingback: Beautiful Bees | Murtagh's Meadow

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