First wild pollinators and brassicas of the season

I’ve even seen my first pollinator of the season – not a bee but a dronefly, a type of hoverfly. It was feeding on the willows which are thick with pollen at the moment. I’ve included a photo from last year as this week’s dronefly was too high up the bush to get a decent picture. Like bees, hoverflies are very important pollinators. Willow is one of the best plants to provide pollen early in the season. Pollen is a vital source of protein for many of our pollinators.

Willow Catkins

Willow Catkins

Dronefly on celendine

Dronefly on celendine

Despite some nice spring sunshine, we’re getting some very wet weather too. The soil is sodden, which is preventing me getting into the garden, but I’ve been trying to do a bit in the greenhouse and polytunnel. The first seeds and potatoes are planted and some are germinating, which is always exciting. This is my first spring with the greenhouse and I’m amazed how warm it can get in there during the day, though obviously at night it still cools significantly.

Germinating seeds

Germinating seeds

We’re enjoying some fresh cauliflower too. I was dubious that the plants would come through the winter but they have and though the cauliflowers are small, they are tasty. The first of the purple sprouting broccoli and the perennial nine-star broccoli has also been harvested. You just can’t beat fresh vegetables from the garden!

Cauliflower

Cauliflower

 

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14 thoughts on “First wild pollinators and brassicas of the season

  1. Miranda McCoy

    One is impressed – I didn’t realise that cauliflowers were so hardy. Not my fav (we all know what my fav must have veggie is) but even so I am impressed. xx

    Liked by 1 person

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  2. Jane

    Lovely vegetables from the garden in March – how wonderful. Will investigate planting willow around the pond – an early protein source – what a surprise.

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
    1. Murtagh's Meadow Post author

      There are some lovely ornamental willows for smaller gardens and they still have valuable pollen too.

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      Reply
  3. Pingback: First bees | Murtagh's Meadow

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